Speaker

Kelly Callahan

Kelly Callahan
Guinea worm disease, caused by a parasite that can reach three feet in length, was long considered one of the “neglected diseases” that afflicts the developing world. But it’s about to be eradicated, thanks to the work of Kelly Callahan and the Carter Center.

Callahan currently works at the Carter Center’s Atlanta headquarters as a liaison to the Center’s health programs and field offices. But before accepting the Atlanta job, she headed up the Center’s Southern Sudan office, targeting Guinea worm eradication, trachoma control and river blindness control.

Prior to working with the Carter Center, Callahan acquired extensive field experience from frequent trips in and out of Sudan and served as an elected representative in Operation Lifeline Sudan, a consortium of United Nations agencies working to bring humanitarian aid to the war-torn country. While in Sudan, Callahan led the Carter Center’s effort to distribute more than 9 million water filters — the key weapons in the fight against Guinea worm disease, which people contract by drinking water contaminated with the worm’s larvae. Callahan’s international health experience began with two years of service in Cote D’Ivoire with the U.S. Peace Corps.